It’s Monday! What Are You Reading? #imwayr 9/21/15

IMWAYR

Visit Teach Mentor Texts and Unleashing Readers to participate in the kidlit version of this weekly meme.

On the blog:

In reading:

thats papas way

That’s Papa’s Way, written by Kate Banks and illustrated by Lauren Castillo, is a sweet story about a little girl’s fishing trip with her Papa. Their different styles and habits are contrasted throughout in writing that is simple and clear. “That’s his way” or “That’s my way” gets repeated throughout the story but never in a way that seems forced or irritating. There is an ease to the relationship between father and daughter that feels comfortable and comforting. Lauren Castillo’s warm art is the perfect match for the story and text.

first grade dropout

First Grade Dropout is a clever story by Audrey Vernick about a boy who has the most embarrassing day ever when he accidentally calls his teacher Mommy. Apparently this really is a typical thing kids do because—over thirty years after it happened—I can still remember the time I called my beloved second-grade teacher, Miss Collins, Mama. Matthew Cordell’s illustrations add humor and heart. Could be a good text to stimulate discussions about friendship, embarrassment, laughing at others, laughing at ourselves.

interstellar cinderella

I love illustrator Meg Hunt’s color palate for Deborah Underwood’s Interstellar Cinderella–she uses colors that we rarely see in picture books and certainly not together. The colors and style of the illustrations gave the book a retro feel to me, which is a neat juxtaposition with the futuristic, space-age setting. The story started a bit slow for me, and I did get tripped up numerous times on the sing-song rhyme (as in, I’m sing-songing in my head as I read and suddenly realize I comprehended not a word on the previous three pages because I was too busy sing-songing). But the rhyme was often clever and rarely felt forced, and Underwood gives a lot of strength and independence to our fairy-tale heroine, who is a gifted mechanic. In the end, Cinderella spurns the Prince’s offer of marriage but volunteers to be his chief mechanic instead.

such a beautiful orange

Big Wolf & Little Wolf: Such a Beautiful Orange!  An odd little story about Big Wolf and Little Wolf who covet the same beautiful orange. Big Wolf plucks it from the tree but has second thoughts after seeing Little Wolf’s longing gaze. He tosses the orange to Little Wolf much too hard, and the orange goes rolling down the hill. Little Wolf takes off after it and disappears into the city for hours. Big Wolf finally sets off in pursuit—and eventually finds the orange but not Little Wolf. Somehow or other he ends up on a train that takes him far out of the city to a new hill where he finds Little Wolf, looking happy, with a big smile on his face. I realize I’m not supposed to read this story so literally, but why did Little Wolf walk past the orange when he found it on the city street? Why did he get on a train and head out to the ocean? How did Big Wolf know to catch the same train later on? I feel that it’s all supposed to be very deep and philosophical, but it left me unsatisfied. Still, I did appreciate Olivier Tallec’s moody art that uses unusual vantage points and perspectives to disorient the reader.

nimona

Nimona is a terrific graphic novel about a shape-shifter who invites herself to become the cherished sidekick of her kingdom’s main bad guy villain, Lord Ballister Blackheart. Despite his name, Blackheart is really more of a good guy than the so-called good guys are. The characters are wry and well-developed, it’s plenty page-turny, there are dragons and science and cool battle scenes galore but also plenty of quiet moments where we see more deeply into the characters. Well-drawn and colored. A really strong debut from Noelle Stevenson.

this is the story of a happy marriage

This Is the Story of a Happy Marriage is a collection of 22 nonfiction magazine and newspaper pieces written by novelist Ann Patchett. The subjects range from divorce to dogs to bookstores to RV vacations and, yes, happy marriages, and all together, they constitute a kind of memoir of her life. She is often witty, frequently wise. There are several strong pieces about writing and reading, so it’s an especially good collection for bookish types to read.

#Classroombookaday continues. College students have turned out to be a very appreciative audience for picture books! Two of my classes also participated in #DotDay. I’m loving the gallery wall outside my office.IMG_5295 IMG_5259 IMG_5262

 

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8 thoughts on “It’s Monday! What Are You Reading? #imwayr 9/21/15

  1. Nimona sounds really interesting! You know, I consider myself to be a pretty avid reader, but I have never read a graphic novel. Do they read similarly to a comic book? Last time I was at Barnes and Noble, I saw a few, but did not actually pick them up, darn it!

  2. How wonderful that you did dot day. I missed the doing this year, but loved how so many approached it. Your students must be so well-prepared for a literary classroom. It makes me happy that you share so many with them. I need to find Nimona & read it. Many review it so positively. Thanks, Elisabeth.

  3. Yay Dot Day! My kids reflected on The Dot this week, and I am so proud of everything they thought of when reflecting on the book. Love the pics 🙂
    I have Interstellar Cinderella to read as well–looking forward to it!

    Happy reading this week!

  4. So many good books!! I love that “That’s Papa’s Way” stars a daughter and her father – it can be difficult to find books about children and their fathers (it’s typically mothers who feature in picture books), so I’m always happy to find a new title to share with parents and caregivers. I’m so excited to pick up Nimona – I love a good graphic novel, and they’re super popular at the library. Funnily enough, I get called “teacher” all the time by the kids at the public library – it’s just a habit for them I think to consider every grown up who’s not their mom or dad a teacher! 🙂

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